Sale!

Assessing maritime security, information and communications technology application

5,000.00 3,000.00

Description

Assessing maritime security, information and communications technology application

 

ABSTRACT

This study was intended to evaluate the maritime security, information and communication technology. The study employed the descriptive and explanatory design; questionnaires in addition to library research were applied in order to collect data. Primary and secondary data sources were used and data was analyzed using the correlation statistical tool at 5% level of significance which was presented in frequency tables and percentage. The respondents under the study were 68 employees of the Rivers port.

The study findings revealed that maritime security, information and communication technology can be assessed; based on the findings from the study, efforts should be made by the Nigerian government and stakeholders in further promoting maritime security in Nigeria, as this would encourage more investors.

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Title Page –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        i

Approval Page   –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        ii

Declaration        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        iii

Dedication          –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        iv

Acknowledgement      –        –        –        –        –        –        –        v

Abstract    –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        vi

Table of Contents       –        –        –        –        –        –        –        vii

 

CHAPTER ONE – INTRODUCTION

1.1    Background of the Study    –        –        –        –        –

1.2    Statement of General Problem   –        –        –        –

1.3   Significance of the study-          –         –        –        –

1.4   Objectives of the study   –          –         –        –        –

1.5   Research questions     –             –         –        –        –

1.6   Research hypotheses       –        –        –        –        –

1.7   Limitations of the study    –       –        –        –        –

1.8   Scope of the study            –       –        –        –        –

1.9   Definition of terms           –        –        –        –        –

 

CHAPTER TWO – REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE

2.1    Introduction       –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –

  • Overview of Maritime Security and Definitions –      –        –

 

2.1.1 An Overview-   –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –

2.1.2 Maritime Security Definitions-          –        –        –        –        –        –

2.2 Fears and Facts in Maritime Security –       –        –        –        –

2.3 Threats to Maritime Security –    –        –        –        –        –        –

2.3.1 Piracy and Armed Robbery against Ships-       –        –        –

2.3.2 Maritime Terrorism-         –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –

2.4 Legal Framework for Maritime Security-     –        –        –        –

2.4.1 Present Instruments –      –        –        –        –        –        –        –

2.3 APPLICATION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN MARITIME

–        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –         –        –        –

4.1 Mandatory Equipment for Maritime Security-     –        –        –

  • Technology adopted for navigational safety (Chapter V, SOLAS)

–        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –       –          –        –        –

 

4.2.1 Automatic Radar Plotting Aid (ARPA) –     –        –        –        –

4.2.2 Automatic Identification System (AIS) –   –        –        –        –

2.4 NANO Technology ‘a way forward in Container Security’-   –

4.3.4 Screening and identification of personnel-       –        –        –

 

CHAPTER THREE – RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

3.1    Introduction       –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –

3.2    Research Design         –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –

3.3    Area of the Study       –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –

3.4    Population of Study   –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –

3.5    Sample size and Sampling Techniques        –        –        –        –        –

3.6    Instrument for Data Collection   –        –        –        –        –        –

3.7    Validity of the Instrument –        –        –        –        –        –        –

3.8    Reliability of the Instrument       –        –        –        –        –        –

3.9    Method of Data Collection  –        –        –        –        –        –        –

3.10  Method of Data Analysis    –        –        –        –        –        –        –

CHAPTER FOUR – DATA PRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS

4.0    Introduction       –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –

4.1    Data Presentation and Analysis –        –        –        –        –        –

4.2    Characteristics of the Respondents     –        –        –        –        –

4.3    Data Analysis    –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –

4.4    Testing Hypothesis    –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –

4.5    Summary of Findings          –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –

4.6    Discussion of Findings        –        –        –        –        –        –        –

CHAPTER FIVE – SUMMARY, CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION

5.0    Introduction       –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –

5.1    Summary  –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –

5.2    Conclusion         –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –

5.3    Recommendations      –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –

References –       –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –

Appendix  –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –        –

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

 

  • Background of the study

Worldwide Port and Maritime operations and their associated facilities and infrastructure collectively represent one of the single greatest unaddressed challenges to the security of nations and the global economy today. The reason that ports and shipping activity are so difficult to secure lies primarily in their technology. Ports are typically large, asymmetrical activities dispersed over hundreds of acres of land and water so that they can simultaneously accommodate ship, truck and rail traffic, petroleum product/liquid offload, storage or piping, and container storage. The movement of freight, cargo (solid or liquid), and transport through a port is generally on a “queuing” system, meaning that any delay snarls all operations. Whether or not delays are related to security, security generally falls by the wayside in the interest of time management or convenience. Globally, there are very few uniform standards for point-to-point control of security on containers, cargoes, vessels or crews – a port’s security in one nation remains very much at the mercy of a port’s security, or lack thereof, in another nation. Organized crime is entrenched in many ports and a large majority of them still do not require background checks on dock workers, crane operators or warehouse employees. Most ports lease large portions of their facility to private terminal operating companies, who are responsible for their own security. The result of this is a “balkanized”, uneven system of port security and operations management as a whole.

1.2    Statement of the problem

Maritime security is, indeed, a quandary (Uadiale and Yonmo, 2010a). The disintegration of central government authority, the lack of maritime security has, therefore, become a grave problem. The Horn of Africa and the Gulf of Guinea are thus symbols of “the few cases in Africa where security onland have spilled over and affected maritime security severely”. The lack of maritime security in the region and the fact that it was not possible to enforce the law and maintain good order at sea, threatened maritime communication, maritime sovereignty and stimulated piracy. While much of the insecurity mid-wifed, piracy of the Somalia coast stems from the collapse of governance, and law and order in Somalia, in the Gulf of Guinea, the situation is somewhat different. Maritime piracy in the Gulf of Guinea is more directly politically driven. In Nigeria, politics onland directly result in offshore actions, causing the hub of insecurity onland in the Niger Delta region to spill into the Gulf of Guinea to promote bad order at sea. According to the maritime watchdog – the International Maritime Bureau (IMB), the waters of Nigeria are now the second most dangerous in the world, next to Somalia.The proliferation of piracy in the West African region has been of concern amongst government and the oil industry since 1999. With militant groups turning pirates in the Niger Delta, claiming that they are sabotaging the oil industry for political purposes in protest of the mismanagement of Nigeria’s oil wealth. However, these political grievances are increasingly taking on a criminal nature (Uadiale and Yonmo, 2010a).